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What do you think are some of the most noteworthy accomplishments and changes in the behavioral health field over the past several years?

10 types of peer programs that promote complete mental health recovery

Here is a list of 10 different peer provided programs that can lead to complete mental health recovery. Let's share ALL of these programs that help promote recovery. http://corinnawest.com/10-model-programs-to-create-complete-mental-health-recovery/ These include: warmlines, peer support centers, respite care, self-directed spending, protests, social inclusion campaigns, emotional CPR, social messaging, peer specialists and harm reduction approaches to coming off medications. Lets ask that 30% of the state mental health block grant is mandated to fund THESE kind of programs.

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    CorinnaCorinna shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    51 comments

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      • anonymousanonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Thanks Kate. There is one person out of these 50 comments who feels for me and my child. That says a lot about America and the people who talk about winning. No money can bring my child back, unless someone interveens., Everyone knows to say NO forced drugging. ,I am not asking for drugs , just asking someone to talk to my son because I have been talking to him for 2 years to get help and NOTHING has happened...in a positive way. Thanks again. It means so much to me that you show compassion...

      • KateKate commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        To the last anonymous person who wrote about your child & being depressed. I've learned from watching my sister go through her illness, nobody wants to help people who are this sick. My sister has been homeless, raped, too much to write about here. Peers say she has to want help. How can she want help if she doesn't know she needs it? The mental health care system is only for the healthier people, not for our family members. They have to keep pushing the shopping carts & eating out of dumpsters. Nice society we have, huh?

      • Thank Goodness It's OverThank Goodness It's Over commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I'm glad to see that forced treatment did not end up on top of this poll. And yet, we are really kidding ourselves if we really think this represents any sort of 'public' vote. This was CLEARLY a complete free-for-all.

      • anonymousanonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        It is not about winning. It is about saving your child so that he can live a life like everyone else. Winning doesn't exist for me and my child , We both are suffering. He with lack of insight, me with depression. Is there any compassion for helpless people. If peer progarms work tell me who will help my child??

      • AnonymousAnonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Looks like WE WON the poll. Boo to the forced drugging "advocates". Down with forced drugging "AOT" violent human rights abusers.

        Any number of meaningless AOT trolls was not enough to sway the public vote away from a respect for human rights.

        People who respect the dignity of autonomy far outnumber the brutal unthinking insightless forced drugging AOT pushers.

      • anonymousanonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Peer support is only provided for people who are willing to accept that. So what happens to the ones who refuse everything? Do they have any chance of recovery? Can their parents ever come out of depression?. Every one of the options given by all of you is only for individula who are willing to accept help. If they are paranoid and delusional they don't listen to anyone. Where is hope for them? They are not 80 years old ,who have much more help than a 20 year old sitting around doing nothing. All of you who talk about options has not worked for me for the last 2 years. Am I suppose to expect my child to get better by himself? NO ONE can do anything to help my son , because they have tried and he refuses all help. Can someone tell me what choices I have???????????It's heart breaking to see your child going down everyday for the last 2 years. Who do I approach???

      • AnonymousAnonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Unfortunately, a lot of people hear the choices and information offered through peer support as one person telling another to not take their meds. While I'm sure that happens sometimes out there, it's not the norm. What is the norm is that when someone receives peer support or becomes a part of a local recovery movement, they often hear for the first time ever that recovery without medication is possible for many, many people. They see for the first time ever people healing in ways that often have little to do with the traditional system of care. They realize their are many more possibilities than they were ever told about. Unfortunately, coming off medications is really hard period, and even ****** when not done properly... Doctors don't even typically know how to do it properly because they don't typically take people off psychiatric medications. And coming off even in the best way CAN cause 'symptoms' to look worse for a while... But for many, that choice is a valid choice that works for them if they have the proper support. And either way, they deserve to know the choices, not be told what to do from ANY perspective.

      • KateKate commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I'm the sister of someone who is mentally ill and doesn't believe she needs help. I don't think it's that she doesn't want help. She gets paranoid and believes all kinds of strange things. She hates the medicine but I don't understand why. It makes her better. She's had peer support but nothing seems to do any good except the medicine. One peer told her she didn't have to take it so she stopped. That caused a major spiral downward into her delusions. The doctors help her more than peers do. She's been on forced treatment a few times and those are the only time she's okay.

      • anonymousanonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Fred, You figured out yourself. But my son who is mentally ill , paranoid and delusional refuses all help . He thinks what he believes is the only truth. What should I do? I am desperate...Please help....

      • anonymousanonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Thanks for the info.. I am doing everything I can do as a Mother. Going to Psychiatrist, therapist, learning how to block unwanted thoughts and on medication to sleep.
        If my son is selling drugs, doing drugs and drinking alcohol and Philadelphia city does nothing to stop him doing illegal stuff who is to blame? He has lack of insight and he said that Police will never catch him because his thoughts /Anosognosia he believes what he feels like.
        There is no help for 2 years and We don't live with him. It's hard to see him the way he is, yet nothing is done by law officers, peer support, Mental health OR anyone. Yet everyone expects us to go on with our lives. Its heart breaking to see some one who is only 20 suffer not knowing he has an illness..We don't bring children to this world so that they can have the worse life and our life is NO better than his...What can anyone suggest for my son in Philadelphia? There are not enough CIT officers in Philly and if one doesn't accept help they can'd do anything . So We sit and wait for a change. It's been 2 long years...

      • fred abbefred abbe commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        To Anonymous, Check out Yuen Method,you might even learn it, check out Parselsus Klinic which is headed by Dr. Rau you might google it and read what is done there and read about the Finnish Model Robert Whitiker writes about.I'm a survivor myself and was'nt able to make progress until I realized I had to figure things out for myself.

      • SusanSusan commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I'm not sure I understand Sue; I was pretty clear in recognizing that recovery may look different and have varying degrees of what some would term "success". It might be helpful to keep in mind that entering recovery may be more difficult for some and some may not choose that path yet I still don't see it helpful to come from that as a foundational assumption. So - is recovery possible for everyone. Yes. Will all choose to actively engage in the process? Maybe not right away, maybe later or maybe never. Yet until the opportunities are there - they don't even have a chance or the hope. This is not black and white or all or nothing concept by any means.

      • SueSue commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Interesting exchange Susan and Nick. I know what Susan says is true for many there are those as described by Nick which Susan appears to refuse to recognise.

      • SusanSusan commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        And as long as we see individual like that that is what we will see. Many who were told they could never recover are now living full productive lives. I know to some that sounds impossible yet - the human spirit once unfettered by negative beliefs become pretty amazing:) I hear you and I hear your concern Nick. Your worries are valid yet I hope you might consider being open to learning from those who have walked through the fire. Recovery works and is possible for everyone who is provided the opportunities, tools and support. It may arrive in varying degrees...it may look different for everyone, but given the chance the outcome potential is huge.

      • NickNick commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        The unfortunate and sad reality is that there are those who are unreachable and therefore require assistance.

      • SusanSusan commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Hi Nick; I don't see it helpful to try to categorize or generalize individuals. Everyone deserves to be treated with respect and given autonomy over their own lives. I believe when we offer help that is truly helpful that those who are "resistant" will benefit. I hear your concerns...yet I don't view anyone as unreachable when they are treated with kindness and compassion within healthy boundaries instead of authoritarian control.

      • NickNick commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Susan you seem to miss the crucial point that there are those who cannot help themselves or put another way, "cannot avoid the hazards of freedom by their own efforts" and therefore require compulsion to protect and promote their own health and well-being.

      • SusanSusan commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Anonymous....I hear you. It IS frustrating when we see those we love struggling and we can't do anything to help them until they want to help themselves. The thing I found about traditional "mental health" services though is that they do rely on compliance and resort to force. Too often its about enabling dependence instead of empowering individuals when it comes down to "helping" someone who doesn't want that kind of help. We can find ways to offer help that they might find helpful.

        I so hear your pain, frustration and worry. One of the best cures for that "lack of insight" I've found is to stop trying to have the insight for the individual and learn to let them experience the natural consequences of their choices. We don't have to agree with or like the choices others make for themselves. I know its hard....yet the best thing we can do for our loved ones most often is learn to deal with our own issues and model healthy living and life lessons. Often when the "push" to "get help" is removed....folks will ask for what they need themselves. What the "recovery" movement has shown us is that those who are "acting out" are very often acting out their own inner pain in the only way they know how.

        What I'm talking about is very much like the 12 step concept of responsibility and letting the individual seek out someone who has the kind of life they want and then asking them to "sponsor" them in their recovery.

        So taking care of ourselves and letting our loved one know there is "peer support" available...then letting go and holding on to our own personal faith that they will find their way and if they don't - we will be ok.

        The worst thing we can do for someone who doesn't think they have a problem is to try to ease our own pain by trying to break their denial by trying to "make" them get help.

        I'm sorry you are in such pain; I can tell you are very worried about your son.

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